The Wildest Sports Moments Caught On Live TV

The Wildest Sports Moments Caught On Live TV


Live TV can amp up already crazy sports moments. Pro athletes stretch the limits of what seems
humanly possible, and adding other humans into the mix is like throwing sporty fuel
on a dramatic fire. Here are some unreal sports moments that were
broadcast on live TV. The 1994 NBA Finals have often been called
the “Forgotten Finals.” In case you’re one of the many who forgot
what happened, the Houston Rockets, led by Hakeem Olajuwon, squared off against Patrick
Ewing and his New York Knicks. On paper it was an awesome match-up between
two of basketball’s most towering figures. In reality, it wasn’t particularly exciting
— until something happened off the court that fans will never forget. Police had recently charged retired NFL player
O.J. Simpson with the killings of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman. He was supposed to turn himself in, but instead
he jumped into his now-infamous white Bronco and fled at an almost leisurely pace along
the freeway. Watching an NFL Hall of Famer lazily evade
capture was apparently more exciting than whatever the Rockets and Knicks were doing,
so NBC relegated the game to a small box in the corner of the screen. Mike Tyson was the type of boxer who wanted
to eat his opponents alive, and in 1997 he almost succeeded. It all went down during the hotly anticipated
sequel to his 1996 showdown with Evander Holyfield, which Holyfield won in the 11th round. Almost 1.9 million people tuned in to Showtime
to watch the “Baddest Man on the Planet” try to even the score with the “Real Deal.” What followed was 1,000 straitjackets’ worth
of crazy. In Round 2 Tyson sustained a gash over his
right eye after receiving what he considered intentional headbutts from Holyfield. Then in Round 3, referee Mills Lane gave Holyfield
an earful for landing a low blow. So Tyson, already incensed about the headbutting,
soon gave Holyfield an earful of teeth. Holyfield hopped with pained disbelief after
having a chunk of his right ear dentally removed. Shockingly, the fight was allowed to continue,
and Tyson then bit Holyfield’s left ear, triggering a much-deserved disqualification. Tyson was hit with a $3 million fine and an
18-month boxing ban. Years later, he appeared opposite Holyfield
in a Foot Locker commercial that featured him apologetically returning the ear. “My ear.” “I kept that in formaldehyde.” NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal was a special
kind of huge. The 7-foot-1 center resembled an oversized
redwood tree on the court. Even the by-no-means small Charles Barkley
once said: “I played in the NBA for 16 years. Shaquille O’Neal is the only guy that I ever
said, wow that’s a big dude.” And how could Barkley not feel that way? The first time they played against each other,
Shaq attacked a basket so hard that it died. The massacre happened in 1993 when Shaq was
an NBA rookie with something to prove. During a nationally televised match-up between
his Orlando Magic and Barkley’s Phoenix Suns, Shaq made a thunderous dunk that caused the
entire basket to collapse. Incredulous viewers accused the NBA and NBC
of rigging the basket to fall. In reality, Shaq was just freakishly beefy. In fact, later that year he ripped a backboard
off the basket. In response, the NBA had to create Shaq-proof
backboards. The NBA has seen more than its fair share
of off-the-wall characters. Among those odd ballers was Ron Artest, who
now goes by “Metta World Peace.” A cursory glance at his basketball past will
make you think his new name is a meta joke. Back when he was an Indiana Pacer, the Artest
formerly known as Ron was about as peaceful as the Thunderdome. The most striking example of this was the
incident known as the “Malice at the Palace.” On November 19, 2004, the Palace of Auburn
Hills became the site of a royal rumble between the home team Detroit Pistons and the visiting
Pacers. With 45 seconds left in the game, the Pacers
had a commanding 15-point lead. But Pistons center Ben Wallace refused to
go down without a fight. After getting fouled by Artest, Wallace retaliated
with a ferocious shove. Officials and players quickly stepped in to
prevent a fistfight, but Pistons fan John Green reignited the spark by chucking his
beer at Artest. An enraged Artest lunged into the crowd, and
two of his teammates followed him into the fray. Foolhardy fans engaged the Pacers in battle
as other spectators hurled trash through the air. The entire debacle aired on a nationwide ESPN
broadcast, which was a huge black eye for the NBA. In response the league suspended nine players
for a total of 146 games, including 86 for Artest. When you truly love someone, you’ll move heaven
and earth to show them how much you care. The same thing happens when you love a sports
team, except it’s creepier since most fans don’t know the players personally. Nevertheless, a dramatic fan gesture can be
insanely sweet, or at least insane. One fan named Mike Sergio loved the New York
Mets so much that he didn’t just move heaven and earth. He moved from earth to heaven and back down
again to show his support. Sergio was no ordinary fan. He was a rock musician, construction worker,
soap opera actor, and amateur skydiver. He knew how to make a dramatic entrance, and
during the 1986 World Series he did just that. The Mets had just lost Game 5 to the Boston
Red Sox, and Sergio decided to cheer his team on in the most scene-stealing way imaginable
during Game 6. With the aid of an accomplice, he parachuted
into Shea Stadium with a banner reading “Go Mets.” Spectators and players alike went wild, and
it all ended with Sergio going to jail. “Oh, are they up Saturday night at Shea!” Check out one of our newest videos right here! Plus, even more Grunge videos about your favorite
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