STEVE AOKI & THE NAIL THAT STICKS OUT | F2FF JAPAN ⚽️🇯🇵

STEVE AOKI & THE NAIL THAT STICKS OUT | F2FF JAPAN ⚽️🇯🇵


Billy:In “Finding Football”
we’ll bring you the best
football talents,
celebrity musicians,
unique football pitches,
and explore the beautiful game
across the globe.
We’re in Japan to see how
cooperation, discipline,
and intensity have fueled
the meteoric rise
in Asian football.
We’ll suit up for the world’s
oldest tekkers game,
get schooled by a master
warrior,
and later we’ll be joined
by EDM superstar Steve Aoki
on the set of our very own
Japanese game show.
This is the busiest
intersection on Earth.
Jezz, it’s mad!
It’s like organized chaos.
3,000 people cross these
streets every time
the light changes,
but listen…there’s no honking,
there’s no arguing.
That’s because here in Japan
people work together
so the whole group can succeed.It’s the key to their success
in business and in football,
but is the Japanese spirit
of cooperation
also holding Japan back
when they get to the World Cup?
We’re here to find out more.Floating directly above the
scramble, ten stories
in the air
is the amazing Shibuya
Futsal pitch.
A testament to both
Japan’s ingenuity
and its passion
for the beautiful game.
We’re here to take another one
of a kind football pitch
off our bucket list,
and to find out more about
Japanese football culture
from the country’s most famous
football coach.
( speaking Japanese )Tom Byer, aka Tom San, is
a native New Yorker
who set up his first
clinic here in 1989,
and has had a front row seatto Japan’s football
transformation ever since.
Japan went from not qualifying
for a World Cup in 1998 – and qualify for every World
Cup since.
– Yeah. What changed?
What was the transition? Tom:I think the J League has
had a huge impact on it.
I mean, next year’s
the 25 year anniversary
and I’d like to think
that we’ve played
a significant role as well,
at least with the youth
development side
to create better
technical players.
If you look
at the characteristics
of Japanese players,
they’re very good technically.And you know some
of the reasons is because the culture is
conducive to the discipline, the organization is
very systematic.So we develop
very good players.
Billy:What did Japan need
to do to win a World Cup?
– Win a World Cup–
– This one’s a tie. Well, they need to,
first of all, develop better strikers, but we’re not producing those
really, really top players, especially goal scorers. You know, this a country
where the culture
is much more tuned to following
and conforming, and not really sticking out. Well, it’s safe to say
we wouldn’t do well in these
parts, would we, Bill? ( all laugh )( music playing )Tom:You know, I watch the J
League awards the other night
and every single oneof the players had the exact
same color tuxedo on. So, and I’ll scratch
my head thinking, “Would this really
happen in Europe?” The Japanese have this saying, “The nail that sticks up
gets hammered back down.” Don’t be different,
don’t be unique.Be the same as everyone else
and we move forward together.
Jezz:To win a World Cup
you can’t have that mentality.
You’ve got to encourage
individualism
as well as teamwork. You know, this whole idea,
“The nail that sticks up,
you bang it down” is to basically discourage
individualism. I think that the saying
and the philosophy that the Japanese embrace
in some ways works
incredibly well. How to produce
the next Neymar, Messi, Ronaldo,
you have to breakthat mold in soccer, don’t you,
in football.
– Tom, it was an absolute
pleasure.
– No, the pleasureis all mine.Billy:
Japan’s oldest team sport
began 1,200 years ago
as a religious ritual in Shinto
temples like this one.
It’s called Kemari and it
symbolizes the Japanese quest
for cooperation and harmony,and it looks an awful lot
like team tekkers.
( music playing )Players are called mariashiand they are Japan’s
first freestylers.
Jezz:
So we walk into this shrine
and it’s deadly silent.
You wanna play the sport,
but you don’t want
to disrespect the shrine.
And then the guy comes overand invites us to play.( music playing )( men cheer ) Billy:
It seemed quite
relaxing to play.
Steady, fun,more ceremonial, Jezz.( music playing )What’s it made out of?
Deer– Deer skin. We should find that out
before I hold the ball. Oh! The guys are all
different agesenjoying themselves out here.Jezz:
Still healthy, fit, strong.
Billy:
How’s it bouncing? Should we test ourselves
against the pros, Bill? Billy:
We challenged all the guys
to face us in a battle.
( speaking Japanese ) Well done! And it comes to the final point. We decide it’s time
to step up our gameand come up with something that
they wouldn’t have seen before.
Yeah! Whoo! Thank you, guys. Thank you. I really like it.
I like the outfits,you got lots of movement.It’s kinda like a gatheringamongst mates
and you play like– they didn’t mind
if they lost a point, –they won a point.
– Jezz:There’s more to it,
isn’t there?
Billy:Yeah.Jezz, do you know what
type of shrine this is? – It’s a Shinto, isn’t it?
– Exactly, mate. It’s called a…
Shinto. Shinto, this guy.( music playing )Billy:
The Tsukiji Fish Market
employs over 60,000 people,covers 33 acres
of downtown Tokyo
and sells over $5 billion
of fish every year.
There’s just fishupon fish, upon fish.( music playing )Billy:
I wanna find some oysters
because I fancy some
and I’m hungry. Oh, what? I’m up for trying
some of this food. Jezz, what would you say
if I told you that someone paid 500 pounds
for a fish? – That’s a lot of money
for a fish.
– Yeah. Now what would you say
if I told you the fishfor 500 pounds, as in weight,
got sold for $2 million?
A tuna.Man, who spent 2 mil
on a tuna? Some G, mate. What is that? Tuna head. Is that a real tuna head? Yeah. There’s something fishy
going around here, Jezz. You’re not laughing at me jokes. Should I scale it down a bit? Look at the size
of them crabs! – Oh, my goodness!
– Wow! Oh, here we go. Here we go. Yeah. ( speaking Japanese ) Mmm. Ah, that’s good. ( speaking Japanese ) That was delicious. ( speaking Japanese ) – Thank you!
– Thank you very much. Jezz:Japan’s culture of
conformity is on full display
on the streets of Tokyo
where legions of gray
suited businessmen
dominate the landscape.
Billy:But on the streets
of the Harajuku district
some of the young
people are opting
for an extreme form
of individual expression.
Jezz:
These are Harajuku Lolitas.
Billy:
This is Misako Aoki.
One of the top Harajuku
Lolitas in Japan.
Misako:
Harajuku fashion,
very famous fashion. Is this only for females
or males as well? ( speaking Japanese ) I’m nearly there. ( speaking Japanese ) Jezz:
Would you say that
dressing up in a costume,
it allows you to express
yourself more? ( speaking Japanese ) ( yells ) ( yelling ) Jezz:
So we walk into this dojo
and we see these two guys
who look like proper
ninja warriors
and apparently they do
this thing called Kendo,
which is like
modern-day samurai.
So, we’re expecting
big things here.
And we stood there
watching and thenwhat happens is
about as underwhelming
as you could possibly imagine.
Isn’t it, Bill?
They’ve done that
to lure us in because we started thinking,“Give me the outfits!
Give me the samurai!
I’m gonna take
this geezer down.”
Okay, I’m worried
about this part, but I’ll give it a go. ( speaking Japanese ) Billy:I mean, the sport is
totally individual.
It’s all about your
own performance,
but getting dressed for the
sport takes about 12 people.Let’s be real with it.I’m gonna let the boss do it
’cause I haven’t got a clue
what’s going on here. I feel quite privileged
getting dressed up
by the sensei. Once he started– Look at Jezz.
He’s got the full outfit on
and then he’s got– Come on! Jezz:
I’m thinking I fancy
my chances.
I’ll always back myself. ( speaking Japanese ) – I can’t really go down.
– ( speaking Japanese ) No, no. Small, small, small,
small, small. ( speaking Japanese ) – Billy: Okay, yeah, yeah.
– No. Billy:
So, there’s us.
Thinking that
we got the tekkers
with the flip technique. ( speaking Japanese ) We’re thinking
we’re the sensei’s.We were about to get schooled.( speaking Japanese ) Billy:
And then the sensei moves
to the side
and in walks Mr. Gladiator,
Mr. Muscle,
Iron Man, stroke Karate Kid
all in one.
( yelling ) No! ( grunts )You’re thinking I’ll flank him
but really I’m thinking
I’m stalling this.
So you thought I’d hit backbut really I was just trying
to not get hit.
It ain’t over. Let’s do this. And I’m looking at him
thinking, “Yes, it is over. Don’t carry this on.” ( laughs )
Ow! ( groans ) I reckon if we done a couple
of months intensive
training out here. Still no chance.( music playing )( shouting ) Billy:
I’m done!
( music playing )Steve Aoki, DJ superstar,is a first generation
Japanese American
with deep roots
to his parents’ homeland.
His dad was a nail who refused
to get hammered down
and left Japan to create
Benihana’s restaurant.
( music playing )Steve will join us on the set
of our very own
Japanese game show,
but first no trip here
would be complete
without visiting Tokyo Tower.The site of so many
epic battles
between King Kong
and Mechani-Kong,
Godzilla and Mothra,Gamera and Super Gyaos,and Godzilla and Monster X.But today it’s the site
of an epic tekkers display
between Billy Wingrove
and Jeremy Lynch.
( music playing )One thing that’s crazy
and kind of
contradicting Japanese culture
is their game shows.They’re totally whacky.Exactly the reason
why we’re doing this here.
We’ve created our own game show. Woman:It’s the F2 Variety Hour
with special guest Steve Aoki.
Welcome to Japan! Ha! Ha! Ha! Baseball. ( speaking Japanese ) Let’s play. Now Steve’s got
to ask us questions, if we get it wrong…
whack! – Yeah!
– Okay. ( speaking Japanese ) Steve: All right. – ( speaking Japanese )
– No. Come on,
you got this one. This is an easy one. You deserve
to get whacked on the head – if you don’t get this one.
– What– Like– – ( speaking Japanese )
– No. – I know this one.
– Hmm. ( mimics clock ticking ) Okay, I’m gonna say…
Belgium? White and red. Fine, I’ll take it. I’m going eight. – Steve: Go, go hard.
– Don’t go hard, Jezz. – Oh!
– ( laughter ) – Steve: You know this one!
– I know this. – I know this.
– I know you–
Everyone knows this. You make it worse
’cause you make us feel so bad. Three, two, one. Both: Time out! – Interview time!
– Yeah, okay! ( speaking Japanese ) Steve, the theme
of our episode is the nail that sticks out
gets hammered down. Is that something
in the Japanese culture
that you can relate to? Yeah, I’ve seen that a lot where a group needs
to rise together. And I love that kind
of camaraderie. And in America
it’s definitely, like, about individuality,
and I feel like my father, he had that Japanese ethic and he was able
to do something very unique. I’m just proud to see my father do
the sticking up in that regard. As I raise my children, I’m gonna have
that same philosophy of you’re gonna learn and fail and learn
from your failures. What makes a Steve Aoki show
a Steve Aoki show? That’s something I ask myself
all the time.And it’s a trial
by error situation
where I’ll bring a new element
to the show.
I gotta do different things that embody that song
or embody that moment. And then I just put
my set together, and I’ll also go, “Okay
at this song I’m gonna
spray some champagne, this song I’m gonna pull out
my raft and then raft
on the crowd.” It is like playing
football. You’re thinking
about a move, – Yeah.
– you know, six steps ahead. And think beyond
a Steve Aoki show that’s what makes
a good DJ a good DJ is being able to read the crowd. ‘Cause you wanna keep
elevating and amplifying this emotional kind of musical
story you’re playing out. So ’cause I want people
to leave going, “I was at a Steve Aoki show and
I, like, I can’t forget it – ’cause I have cake
all over my face.
– Yeah, yeah, yeah. Hey, guys!
Hey, guys! ( shouting ) Food or football! Yeah! – You choose and you eat!
– Wow! So we have to choose
food or football. And some of them are real food
and some of them are not food. No touch!
No touch! No touch! – No touch.
– No touch! Whoo! – Food.
– Really? – Ah!
– Ah. Ah! ( speaking Japanese ) It’s coffee. – Coffee.
– I’m gonna take… – this one. Food, food, food.
– ( speaking Japanese ) Ah. ( groans ) Definitely not food. – I’m gonna go for the couple
of–
– ( speaking Japanese ) – ( speaking Japanese )
– I’m saying these are food. Ah. ( speaking Japanese ) – Ah.
– Ah. Wow! Wow, look at this!
This is food. That’s quite– that’s
quite nice that cake. Whoa! It’s actually
really hard. – Ah!
– Let me– let me eat this part. Yeah. It tastes chewing gum
almost like taffy. ( speaking Japanese ) Football. Ah. ( speaking Japanese ) Nice little crunch
to that. Shin pad. It’s football. – Steve.
– Well, I gotta go
with the trophy. Trophy, okay. Ah! Impossible. I’m looking at this. I know we can’t touch it. ( speaking Japanese ) No touch! ( all yelling ) Relax, relax, relax. – No touch!
– No touch! That is real.
That is 100%. I know what you’re gonna do! – If you eat.
– Right. No, ’cause I’m gonna put it
in my mouth and he’s gonna… Yeah, now look
he’s trying to– ( laughter ) Ah. Boo! ( speaking Japanese ) Yeah, that’s definitely real. ( speaking Japanese ) ( horn blares ) ( speaking Japanese ) – Let’s do it!
– ( speaking Japanese ) ( cheering ) We’re ready!
We’re ready! ( speaking Japanese ) ( all exclaiming ) – Jezz: Oh, my God.
– Billy: They’re targets. ( speaking Japanese ) Billy:
This is–
Yeah, right. ( speaking Japanese ) Okay!
( cheers ) Go, Billy! Go, Billy!
Go, Billy! One point!
Yeah, one point! Yeah! Hey! Go! Two points!
Two points! Three points! Three points! Oh, four points! Eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one! Finish! Yes! Man:Are you ready?– I’m ready.
– Okay! Oh! Close. Oh! Yeah! Oh! – Yeah.
– Point! ( speaking Japanese ) ( speaking Japanese ) Oh! – Come on!
– Oh! Six, five, four, three, two, one! Finish! Man: Last challenger! Steven! – ( speaking Japanese )
– Yes, yes. – Bonus.
– Bonus time! No, this is so–
No! No! No! ( speaking Japanese ) Hey! Come on, Steven! Oh! Oh! Made one. Hey. Okay, that’s better,
that’s better. Yeah! Oh! Oh, direct target. ( speaking Japanese ) Thank you! We’ve had an amazing time
in Japan. Billy:We took our tekkers
to a shrine and played Kemari.
Jezz:
We tried Kendo,
where we got hammered down.
Billy:
And then we met up
with Steve Aoki.
A superstar who’s ambition and
creativity lead to his success.
Together we came up with a
football Japanese game show.
Japan are a rising power
in the world of football. And we wish the Blue Samurai
nothing but success
in the future. – Steve Aoki, you legend,
it’s been an absolute honor.
– Thank you, guys. – And thanks to the guys
as well.
– Thank you! – Thank you.
– In the meantime, all that remains
to be said is… Both:
Love, peace, and tekkers.( music playing )all: Oh! Billy:Next time
on “Finding Football”…
Jezz:We’re gonna be taking
ourselves right outside
of our comfort zones.
and head into Rio de Janeiro.Cool!
Yeah.– Let’s get out of here.
– It’s not safe, it’s not safe. Billy:Look at this!This is giving me goose bumps.Oh!Love, peace,
and tekkers.

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