LVOA-C Rifle Review – Is War Sport Industries Rifle Worth It?

LVOA-C Rifle Review – Is War Sport Industries Rifle Worth It?


I’m positive many you saw the title to this
video and before Tai Lopez could finish humble bragging his way through his, This is me in
my garage with a Lamborghini after reading all of these books, self-help motivational
diatribe YouTube pre-roll ad, you and your little twitter fingers already typed out a
comment how you built a rifle as good if not better than The LVOA-C Rifle from the ground
up for half the cost. Because, yes! War Sport industries is charging $3000 for their LVOA-C
Rifle. I’ll admit that when you slap a 3k price tag on something as ubiquitous as an
AR-15 you instantly become the most hated company in the world with no one rooting for
your success simply because of the price of your product. I also know that there are a
good number of you out there who genuinely want to know, is it worth it?
Say what you want about the price of the LVOA-C rifle, but this is a pretty damn unique looking
rifle compared to the 50 million other ARs on the market. Granted, much that uniqueness
is due to the skeleton like super extended rail and the 50 shades of gray tactical bondage
cord snaking its way through the rail cut outs. Personally, I Enjoy extended rails.
To my eyes, extended rails give an AR a more complete and balanced look. However, the LVOA
takes it one step further by extending the rail to the edge of the brake. If you’re
like me, you likely think it looks great, if you hate extended rails, then you probably
think it’s in desperate need of a circumcision. Over the last five years, I’ve concluded
that in a former life, I was an overweight Goth female with emo tendencies, because I
love cupcakes, I listen to Drake and my absolute favorite color is “Black.” This rifle is
in foliage green, which typically I feel is a miserable color, only suitable for hiding
in national parks and recycling bins. But on the LVOA the color just works, the same
way Phoenix Yellow just worked on the E46 BMW M3, which I also think typically is a
really shitty color but for when it’s used on an E46 M3. There’s a slight sheen to
the finish that makes this rifle look more vibrant and well, expensive. Too many rifles
these days come in these ashy matte finishes that make the guns look like they’ve been
buried in baby powder for five years. As striking as the LVOA is to look at it can
come off a bit tactically pretentious. War sport tries hard to convince you that this
rifle is a tactical master piece, almost to the point nausea. Take the name LVOA for example.
LVOA stands for Low Visibility Operations Applications; I’m still trying to figure out
what the hell that means in normal people talk. Then there’s the War Sport Bungee. When
I Look at the bungee cord wrapped around the rail, I’m left wondering, what the hell
is this stuff supposed to do? But it looks cool enough that after five minutes of guessing
I don’t really care. However, they say the bungee offers a secure grip in wet conditions,
lowers noise signature, and can aid in wire cable management.
From my experience, If you run a hand stop or fore grip you won’t notice much in the
way of improved gripping properties from the bungee, but without these things, having the
bungee is better for your grip than not. When I shoot a rifle I wear two sets of ear pro,
in the ear and over the ear, so unless we’re talking suppressor quiet, I’m not going to
notice a small drop in noise signature, so that’s a moot point for me. As far as aiding
in cable management, yes, it does aid with cable management, but trust me, you’ll want
to go easy with the accessories on this rifle, because the last thing it needs is more weight.
I like the bungee, but more for its aesthetic qualities than its functional properties.
The functional properties aren’t revolutionary to me but seeing the LVOA rail without the
bungee cord really strips the gun of some of its character. At 7.0 lbs, The LVOA is
not a light rifle, nor is it the heaviest rifle in the world. I’m a little old school,
in that when something feels Solid and has some weight to it I figure it must be of quality.
In your hands, the rifle feels like one uninterrupted piece of metal instead of an upper and lower.
There’s no rattling, no shaking, or flexing; it’s freaking solid. But I can’t deny
that a heavy gun is a heavy gun no matter how much “quality” it may translate to and
the LVOA is flirting with being almost too heavy, but it’s not quite there yet. If you
pick this rifle up after handling say a PWS Mk114 the difference is noticeable, but on
its own without a lighter rifle to compare it to, it’s not a deal breaker.
When shooting the LVOA-C, I kept All I wanted to do was abuse this it, Like a teenager in
a rented Camaro I ran it hard all the time like I was mad at it. I wanted to see it fail;
I wanted to roundhouse kick it off its tactical high horse. The way this rifle recoils reminds
me of the mechanical letters on a vintage typewriter reaching up and smacking the page
with each pull of the trigger. Each shot feels so deliberate and purpose driven, making each
and every shot feel like it matters. The proprietary top hat compensator does a good enough job
keeping the rifle flat and the recoil low, but you don’t really care because there
is something fun about how the energy from each round feels like it starts at the tip
of the muzzle travels down the length of the rifle and explodes out through the magazine
well, much like flushing the toilet on an airplane at 30,000ft. It sounds jarring but
it’s not, I wouldn’t call it a soft shooter in the typical sense of the word, more like,
soft enough to make shooting it enjoyable but not so soft it’s boring.
This thing can spit bullets out with the best of them. The harmonics of the recoil is so
deliberate and predictable I can just ride the wave of energy from each shot to the next
making rapid-fire not only easy but mind-numbingly fast. I have to give a lot of this credit
to the CMC flat faced single stage trigger whose praises I’ve sung in prior videos and
doesn’t disappoint here. As I said before, weight is weight, and when it comes to mobility
and transitioning from target to target, you do have to man handle this rifle a bit. The
extended rail makes the rifle a bit front heavy which if you’re a c-clamper won’t
bother you much, but if you’re not a fan of the c-clamp hold then you’ll be more perceptive
of the rifles weight up front. However, Running with the LVOA is where the rifles front heavy
tendencies really show itself the most. From a reliability standpoint, I pumped a
hell of a lot of rounds through this rifle over the period I’ve had it. It chewed up
and spit out every round I loaded into it. But let’s be honest, no one really cares
about anything I just said. What you want to know is whether this rifle is worth 3k.
I really want to trash this gun for being overpriced hype, but not because I believe
it is, but because I feel like that’s what I’m supposed to do in order to come across
more credible. Make no mistake, 3k on an AR is a lot of money for most people. The very
last time I shot this rifle, I went out by myself with no cameras for a solid 2 hours
running athletic shooting drills with it to really get a grasp on how I felt about the
rifle and whether it was worth 3k dollars. Here’s the thing, there’s no question,
and they spared no expense when they built this rifle. From the sights to the grip, if
they couldn’t make it themselves they put the best parts they could find on it. I can’t
speak for every rifle, but the rifle I have is freaking incredible. Not because it does
something no other rifle can, but because I can’t shake the feeling someone put their
soul into the design of this rifle. It’s a parts rifle with a level of solidarity and
uniformity between parts that some proprietary rifles can’t even match.
Is it perfect? No. Is it my favorite AR? No. Its noticeable heavy, some of its so called
tactical prowess is a little corny, you can’t suppress it, its looks are a hate it or love
it kind of thing, and it cost more than what some people make in a month. But I feel confident
saying, if you went ahead and plopped the 3k for this rifle I’d bet you wouldn’t
regret it. So yes, to me it’s worth it, because there’s nothing left to do the rifle,
it’s like walking into a Porsche dealership and ticking every option available. Sure,
the engines in the back and sounds like a Dyson vacuum cleaner, and unless you’re
really into them, you can’t tell the difference between a 2007 911 and a 2016. But the things
it does well
make you so happy it’s worth the price of admission.

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